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Will There Be A Second Encouragement Of Stimulus This Year? Aoc, Hawley Agrees Relief Should Include Payments Of $ 1,200

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Neither of the two competing stimulus proposals introduced this week includes a second round of stimulus checks. However, President-elect Joe Biden has said that $1,200 direct payments “may still be in play.”

The first is a $908 billion bipartisan congressional plan introduced by a coalition of Republican and Democratic senators as a middle-of-the-road compromise that’s less than half of the Democrats’ latest demand of $2.2 trillion and nearly double the $500 billion “targeted” package proposed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The proposed bill includes an extra $300 per week in unemployment benefits; $160 billion for state and local governments; and nearly $290 billion in aid for small businesses through the Paycheck Protection Program.

Democratic leaders—including Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer—have backed the plan. But McConnell quickly rejected the proposal, unveiling on Tuesday a slightly tweaked, $550 billion version of his previous proposal that has already been blocked twice this summer.

President-elect Joe Biden speaks virtually to the National Association of Counties Board of Directors December 4, 2020 at the Queen theater in Wilmington, Delaware.
Alex Wong/Getty

In August, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin indicated that the government would be able to get out tens of millions of direct payments within weeks of a bill passing.

The deadline to pass the next federal budget falls on December 11, and Democrats want to seize on that window to approve a stimulus package. If a bill with checks is negotiated before that date, then some Americans could start receiving $1,200 checks by the end of year.

Throughout the past five months of negotiations, additional direct payments have been proposed by Democrats and Republicans. However, not every commonality would make it onto a smaller deal, if Congress decides to go with a piecemeal approach first.

But both parties are still in disagreement with significant differences. While it’s possible that a relief deal could pass before the Senate adjourns on December 18, that agreement would likely not include checks.

Newsweek reached out to Pelosi and McConnell’s offices for further comment.

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